PASSCAL Experiments http://www.passcal.nmt.edu/rss/experiments en flume http://www.passcal.nmt.edu/scheduledetails/exptnumb/201605 The experiment aims to record the seismic signature of experiments at the USGS debris flume at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Blue River, OR in order to better understand the physics of how surface flows like debris flows and landslides generate seismic waves and to test techniques for detecting and tracking such events. CU Bahamas http://www.passcal.nmt.edu/scheduledetails/exptnumb/201618 In recent years there has been earthquake activity on the north and east shores of Cuba. Better azimuthal coverage is needed to the northeast (the Bahamas) to improve earthquake location errors. USGS has a moratorium on adding new stations, but Bob Detrick has agreed to loan a digitizer and sensor for approx. 3 years for the station. GAS2016 http://www.passcal.nmt.edu/scheduledetails/exptnumb/201617 Chemical explosions are often used as a proxy to study seismic wave radiation from nuclear explosions. Therefore, it is important to understand the physics of the chemical explosions as a source of seismic waves. One of the important features of the chemical explosions is the release of explosive gases during the explosive detonation, which is often overlooked in seismic studies. Recent observational results from chemical explosions indicate that explosive gas products may significantly affect the radiated seismic waves. For example, it is known that a higher amount of gas released in a chemical explosion results in an increase in rock damage due to the opening and propagation of fractures. However the effect of the cavity gas and the rock damage affects the far-field seismic radiation is not well understood. The field experiment is designed in order to quantify the influence of gaseous products on seismic amplitudes We will use the explosives with different amount of gaseous by-products but similar velocities of detonation. This can be achieved by adding aluminum powder to the explosive mix in order to reduce the volume of gas produced by the explosion and released into in the cavity. Adding aluminum may slightly reduce the velocity of detonation, but to a lesser degree than using different explosives. The hypothesis being tested is: "Does an increase in the volume of cavity gas cause an increase in the low frequency component of the spectra?" The analysis of the seismic signals from explosions conducted using explosives with different amounts of gas detonation products should provide: (a) insight into the role of gas effects on seismic wave generation, which is essential if chemical explosions are to be used as surrogates for nuclear tests and (b) improved methods of discriminating chemical explosions from small nuclear explosions. Of particular interest are the differences in the body (P and S) and surface (Rg and Lg) wave radiation as a function of the gas content. GAS2016 http://www.passcal.nmt.edu/scheduledetails/exptnumb/201617 Chemical explosions are often used as a proxy to study seismic wave radiation from nuclear explosions. Therefore, it is important to understand the physics of the chemical explosions as a source of seismic waves. One of the important features of the chemical explosions is the release of explosive gases during the explosive detonation, which is often overlooked in seismic studies. Recent observational results from chemical explosions indicate that explosive gas products may significantly affect the radiated seismic waves. For example, it is known that a higher amount of gas released in a chemical explosion results in an increase in rock damage due to the opening and propagation of fractures. However the effect of the cavity gas and the rock damage affects the far-field seismic radiation is not well understood. The field experiment is designed in order to quantify the influence of gaseous products on seismic amplitudes We will use the explosives with different amount of gaseous by-products but similar velocities of detonation. This can be achieved by adding aluminum powder to the explosive mix in order to reduce the volume of gas produced by the explosion and released into in the cavity. Adding aluminum may slightly reduce the velocity of detonation, but to a lesser degree than using different explosives. The hypothesis being tested is: "Does an increase in the volume of cavity gas cause an increase in the low frequency component of the spectra?" The analysis of the seismic signals from explosions conducted using explosives with different amounts of gas detonation products should provide: (a) insight into the role of gas effects on seismic wave generation, which is essential if chemical explosions are to be used as surrogates for nuclear tests and (b) improved methods of discriminating chemical explosions from small nuclear explosions. Of particular interest are the differences in the body (P and S) and surface (Rg and Lg) wave radiation as a function of the gas content. flume http://www.passcal.nmt.edu/scheduledetails/exptnumb/201605 The experiment aims to record the seismic signature of experiments at the USGS debris flume at the H.J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Blue River, OR in order to better understand the physics of how surface flows like debris flows and landslides generate seismic waves and to test techniques for detecting and tracking such events. GeoGirls http://www.passcal.nmt.edu/scheduledetails/exptnumb/201504 A series of small experiments will be designed by middle school students attending an outreach program at Mount St. Helens during the summers of 2015 and 2016. The students will design and carry out small research projects using portable seismic instruments and other geophysical techniques to record and study dynamic processes at Mount St. Helens. This experimental outreach program is part of Kate Allstadt's NSF Postdocoral fellowship starting in September, 2014 at the USGS Cascade Volcano Observatory. NMT_ERTH325 http://www.passcal.nmt.edu/scheduledetails/exptnumb/201608 New Mexico Tech, ERTH325 class, refraction experiment 2016 IAS http://www.passcal.nmt.edu/scheduledetails/exptnumb/201620 Imaging faults near Socorro, NM LeConte Glacier http://www.passcal.nmt.edu/scheduledetails/exptnumb/201607 Passive seismometers will be used to study iceberg calving and subglacial discharge at LeConte Glacier, a tidewater glacier located in Southeast Alaska. PoroTomo http://www.passcal.nmt.edu/scheduledetails/exptnumb/201601 Deploy 3-component seismic instruments at ~240 closely spaced sites in the Brady Hot Springs geothermal field near Fernley, NV, for approximately 2 weeks to record ambient noise and active-source data during changes in fluid pumping in the geothermal reservoir.