DRINKS I LIKE AND SOME I DON'T


Always on the lookout for something new to taste.
Hey! I think I remember using a pair of those down in Antarctica.
(Picture stolen from the Ardbeg web site.)

I'm not a drunk or anything, but I could probably be talked into becoming one with some of the liquids in this lineup of precious bottley fluids. (Get it? The movie, Dr. Strangelove? Oh, never mind.) I could also be talked out of becoming one with some of the others. These descriptions will change from time to time, because your tastes change from time to time as you experience more and more whiskys. What you liked yesterday may not seem as good today -- even when it is the same whiskey. These aren't really tasting notes or anything. Just some drivel.


I DO NOT HAVE A DRINKING PROBLEM!


There's milk, a steak, a catsup bottle behind the Scapa, and a soy sauce bottle behind the Evan Williams (low sodium even!) in addition to the chocolate covered espresso beans and the pickles. Also, some of the stuff in the door is food. So there. What I do have is a heating and air conditioning problem. It's all manual. Like I have to adjust the thermostat for the heat BY HAND (My God! What century is this??), and turn the swamp cooling on and off MANUALLY! (Oh, the humidity!) The temperature varies quite a bit during the day from season to season, and during the summer the temperature inside will get warm and stay there if I'm out of town. I was afraid that would damage the goods in some way, so I keep everything in the fridge. As far as I know all the scotches just think they are in the basement of a house somewhere in Kirkwall. The rums may be shivering a bit.

Realistically? I bet I average less than 2 drinks/drams/shots per week. The Scottish government recommends no more than 3-4 "units" (i.e. drinks/drams/shots) per DAY. At this rate I'll have no trouble getting into Heaven. Don't overdo it. It's not about quantity. It's about quality. Besides that some of this crap is expensive. You'd have to be a politician with a taxpayer funded expense account to be able to afford 3-4 units per day.


THE GOOD STUFF
...OR...
STUFF THAT MAY BE GOOD THAT I HAVEN'T TRIED YET

At a cask strength of 60% I'm surprised it doesn't eat through the cask. It's full of various highland and sherry flavors, but you have to add a bit of water to keep the buring down to a comfortable temperature so those flavors have a chance of reaching your tounge. It's pretty good, and a nice contrast to the peaty Islay scotches.

No age statement...it's becoming naughty to do that. This is a release whose profits (which are slightly considerable) will be donated to the 2015 Nepal earthquake relief efforts. I'll open it up in a few years and see what relief efforts taste like.

No age statement. Probably could be characterized as being young. Pretty good mixture of flavors. A little water helps. Is not bad, but still, a little young-ish tasting...if I even know what I'm talking about. This is one of the cheaper versions of their stuff. When it's gone I'll try a different one. It's pretty good.

When you order stuff from the UK, like a bottle of the Amrut Everest, it's silly not to order a bottle or two more. Because of the shipping costs, of course. Bought, but not tried.

Darn those shipping costs. Also bought, but not tried. 62.8%!?

A couple of teaspoons of water really sets this off. It has a smooth, but spicy peaty flavor. I'd have to rate it above the stock 10 year old, but it's almost in a higher class.

If you are going to drink rum don't screw around. Be a man and drink RUM. At this octane it's best to just sip it or mix it with good ol' Coke (not Pepsi or Diet Coke, for God's sake). This is great to drink on day-of-year 151 (around the end of May). Everclear is not a good idea on day-of-year 200.

Bought, but not tried.

Bought, but not tried.

Bought, but not tried.

Bought, but not tried. Got it on sale. At Bashas'. In Sedona, Arizona.

Bought, but not tried.

Oooo. Very nice. From Islay, but very different. A little Speysidey, but not really. With a bit of water it changes, not in a bad way, but I prefer it neat.

Billy Stitchell worked at Caol Ila for about 40 years and ended up the distillery manager. This bottling was in honor of his retirement. I'm assumming he was a good manager, that after that much time was able to get things running well, and that this is probably good. I'll find out someday.

I didn't expect this to be bad and it wasn't. This was almost too complex to describe. While it says unpeated our panel of experts were sure they tasted peat. One 'I play a doctor in my mind' doctors in the crowd suggested that since it's Caol Ila you just expect it to be peaty and what we were tasting was psychosomatic phantom peat. It's quite good and almost nothing like the Caol Ila 12, which is also quite good.

We tried a bit more of this later the same weekend, and that time it did not seem to have a peaty taste. Very interesting. How do they do that??

OK, you don't always have to to be a man and drink a man's rum. Sometimes you can just be a pirate.

Nice and light. I call it "cute". I'd also call it a girl's scotch, but that would probably be wrong on a whole bunch of levels. I wouldn't mind a shot of this every so often, but I don't own any...

Later: Thanks to Santa in 2016, now I do! Very nice. I'll break it open some day.

This one came out of left corn field. On a trip through Le Claire, Iowa, my brother stopped at a distillery, tasted a shot of this, and bought a bottle. Several in attendance for the opening of the bottle didn't like it, but he and I thought it was good. It had a definite corn whiskey flavor to it. Iowa. That makes sense. A little water calmed it down and brought out a bit of sweetness after 10 or 15 minutes.

The Cody part has to do with Le Claire being the birthplace of William Fredrick "Buffalo Bill" Cody.

Nice. A lot like their White Label, but a little bit more. It's fine neat, but a little water helps to bring out more aroma and taste, also like the 12. I like these Dewar's beverages.

Nice. Sampled a fresh bottle from the early 2000's and after letting the alcohol burn off a bit it was quite spicy and very interesting.

Bought a new bottle to open someday.

This was kind of surprising. I could have sworn Evan Williams was right up there with Boone's Farm in terms of drinkablity (at least a couple of decades ago), but this was actually quite good. Neat it almost has a scotch-like quality to it. With a little water it has a good bourbon-like flavor...which is handy since that's what it is. If you find it coming out tasting like gin -- with or without water -- I'd get a new bottle, or stop drinking.

Bought, but not tried yet.

Bought, but not tried yet.

Bought, but not tried.

Bought, but not tried.

Opened a fresh bottle of someone else's of this and it was quite nice. It plays a few wine notes as you sip it. Quite good.

Tried this same bottle a few months later. The bottle was getting low. A lot of the wine influence was gone, or it got dryer (in a wine-like way). It was still OK.

Bought, but not opened. Instead I scarfed some of someone else's. It was good. No peat to speak of if you don't like peat. Just light and tasty.

What is this? Ooooo. A gift. From the description it should be good. I'll open it up and try it someday.

Picked this up while on a trip for New Years. Not bad. When I got home I was able to test this against a bottle of the 25 year old version that I had. Over about 30 minutes, tasting each every few minutes, the two changed quite a bit. The interesting thing was that they both tasted similar, but at different times. The 25 always tasted younger or sharper with a slightly sour tone, while the 30 was always a bit smoother. In the end I preferred this 30, but will still enjoy finishing off the 25.

Opened this and shared some with the neighbors. This is good. I've never thought of just sipping gin, but you can with this. You don't need to add water or anything. It's very light and piney. Someone said they had heard of a martini made with this, but using a cucumber slice with black pepper, instead of an olive. I'm not a martini fan, but might have to try at least one of those.

The gold standard at this point in time. I used to think it was the regular Bulleit Bourbon until I tasted this. Have gone through a number of bottles. Every time I introduce friends to it they steal it.

After further review...the Evan Williams Single Barrel may be edging this one out. More side-by-side testing is needed.

Really good in a cough syrupy kinda way. They now have a spiced version that's pretty good too, but...umm...I don't have a picture of it. Don't remember how that happened.

Very good. Will have to have a shootout with the Black and determine my favorite.

Later: Done. This is better than the Black.

Bought, but not sampled. I liked Taiwan when I was there, so it should be good, right? I'm not so sure about these 'bottled specially for...' versions, but what the heck.

Bought, but not tried. Interesting story behind it all. What? I'm not your mother. Go look it up.

Bought, but not tried. Limited Edition. I should say so. It's only 750ml.

Bought, but not tried. It's a "Limited Edition", so it must be good, and it's cask strength, so even if it isn't you probably won't care.

After some testing I think I like this the best over Laphraoig and Ardbeg. Caol Ila was in there too, but it's just a whole different favorite. The Caol Ila is from Islay, but it's just not like the other three. The Lagavulin Distiller's Edition would beat this version out, but it's a little pricy for every day drinking.

I thought I was buying the bottled in 2014 edition to replace the bottled in 2013 version that I got to drink a little of then give away, but I bought two bottles of this and they were bottled in 2012. I guess that's a good thing. Maybe I'll try one some day.

Wow! Buy this. I like Lagavulin 16, but this is a whole other thing. I found that it really doesn't even need water. It's really smooth neat. If you do add water be careful. Its taste changes quite quickly. I like the neat flavor best.

I drank some of this then gave about half of it away. That was a dumb move. I couldn't find any more if it, so bought two 2014 editions...or so I thought (see above).

Three total teaspoons of water for a dram of this would not be out of line. It changes a fair amount with each teaspoon. Try 1/2 teaspoon at a time. Not as much peatiness as you would expect. Very interesting if you have the time and setting to really slow down and taste it. Lot's of vanilla comes blasting through toward the end of the bottle.

Bought, but not tried. Vanilla, seaweed and idodine. Three of my favorite flavors in one bottle!

Bought, but not tried. They are going to discontinue it, so I bought a bit in case it is good. I'll save it for a few years and see.

Bought, but not tried yet.

Bought, but not tried yet.

Had a dram of this at a bar in downtown Flagstaff, Arizona. It was good. I'd be more specific, but it may have been the second or third dram of stuff that evening.

Later: Have had in other drinking establishments. It's good and seems to be in a lot of places.

This is it. This is a re-creation of the scotch that was found in 2007 in two cases under the flooring of Ernest Shackleton's hut at Cape Royds, Antarctica. 25 cases of it was originally sent down for the British Antarctic Expedition of 1907. I bought two bottles, and will probably just keep them for a while. Unfortunately you can't get much of a nose through the bottle. If I'd only known about it when I was in his hut, and had a crowbar with me, I could have enjoyed the real thing right after getting out of prison. When you are in those huts (Scott's and Shackleton's) you treat it like you are in a church. With everything those guys went through I'm surprised there was any scotch left over.

Bought samples of this with the big bottles. It's good. Not realy like anything else I've tasted so far. It's not light and fluffy, but it's not overpowering. It's just good. I may not have two unopened bottles for long.

Bought, but not tried. This is the second version of a re-creation of the scotch found beneath Shackleton's hut in Antarctica. This "Journey" version was commissioned for the expedition of men that will attempt to repeat Shackleton's crossing of the Southern Ocean from Elephant Island to South Georgia in a 23 foot replica of Shackleton's lifeboat, the James Caird, and then hike across the interior mountains of South Georgia to a village on the other side of the island. This original trip became known as the Endurance Fiasco. The bottle is wrapped in straw as a packing material like the original bottles were, except now the straw is plastic. I grew up around farms and I don't remember seeing those kinds of bales at all.

I've been to Antarctica five times, and read over a dozen books about Antarctica, and I can just barely start to comprehend what all of those guys went through a hundred years ago during the Heroic Age of Antarctic exploration. That's what it's called, and that's what they were.

Sometimes guys just wanna have fun. You can mix this with just about any juice and make something that tastes good, and, I guess, you don't have to be a man or a pirate to do it.

Very strong (at ~56%). Add water about 1/2 teaspoon at a time until you find a taste you like. Every 1/2 teaspoon makes it taste like a different bottle of stuff. Very good, and very interesting.

Labels don't get much more straightforward than that. This is quite interesting. More testing is needed, but It is very good.

Very nice. Tasts like a nice Islay Scotch, but with just a little bit of fruit. Has a nice aroma. This was my first Japanese Whisky and it probably won't be my last. OK...you got me. It was the cheapest of the four Japanese whiskies in the store. But it's still real good. It's very...precise...in the way it tastes. I'll up the ante a bit for the next one and see what happens. I suspect it will be good too.

Later: Ummm...didn't like the next version up from this as much. This is still my favorite.

Ummm...QUITE good. Very nice. It's sweet, which is nice once in a while.

A nice Italian "digestive" to enjoy after dinner -- when digestion is a popular activity. Had it quite often while I was working in Italy. A little bit of this, or a little bit of limoncello after the evening meal in Italy is standard...or grappa. Forgot about the grappa. Generally speaking everything in Italy tastes great.

This was a gift from a co-worker that went to a project in Costa Rica. It wasn't bad straight or with a little Coca-Cola.

Another gift! This is not like the others. It has been "approved" by several dead kings and queens of England. The taste strikes me as being more old-fashioned in a good way. It's like it doesn't try to be modern and flashy, but just a good, solid scotch. I like that. Very nice.

When you open a $300 bottle of anything you expect it to be good. Real good. Actually, if it's your money, you especially hope it doesn't taste like crap. This does not taste like crap. All of the writing on the label lists the different sherry, whisky and scotch ingredients that make up this beverage. The list is impressive -- with some of the items going back to the 1950's -- and so is the taste. It's almost a port/sherry flavored scotch. I'll have to save my pennies and get one of these.

My brother had this bottle. The relative that bought it for him will probably get crossed off of the list of lesser relatives.

Finished off this bottle around the end of 2014. It had been open for about a year. There were just a couple of drams left. It was OK, but not as good as it was when it was fresher. A lot of the wine influence was gone. Adding water made it spicier. Interesting.

Later: Oh dear. Me brother and I went in together and bought a bottle of this. Maybe we'll open it up around Christmas...some year.

Opened a bottle of this that my brother had and had a shootout between it and my Scapa 16. They are a good bit different from each other. This was good. It's not made anymore.

Nice, and available. The Scapa 14 that this was tested against is no longer made. Both Scapas were good. This one tasted more...modern...verses the 14. It had a bit of a more gasoline/petrol/benzine (whatever you call it) aroma to it in the beginning, but that pretty much went away after the 4th or 5th pouring. That wasn't all in the same evening. Behave yourselves.

This is a cheap little blend that tastes nice with a spalsh of water when you are not in a Lagavulin/Laphroaig state of mind. Learned about it at a scotch "class" at Total Wines. Bought a bottle, had a little, then ended up giving the rest away. Not because it was bad, but because I'm not very smart.

Bought, but not tried yet.

Nice. Aromatic. Really a lot to smell before getting around to the actual sipping.

Fruity. Spicy. Aromatic. Needs a teaspoon and a little of water. Worth the price.

Drank a bit of this when I lived in the Philippines. It gets the job done. I'll open this someday. This is even the Extra Smooth Quality version. The Not So Smooth Quality version is also good. This and San Miguel Beer... Better than a Corona Beer commercial.

I like Christmas. Dear, sweet relatives give you things. Like this. Does getting presents like this mean you might have a drinking problem? Ehh. I don't care. This is really good neat or with a touch of water.

Bought, but not tried.

Bought, but not tried. This sherry finish stuff is getting popular.

Later: Bought a few of these various wine-finished things. Had trouble finishing the first one of them (Kilchoman in the "bad" section below). We'll see as time goes on.

Bought, but unopened.

This came as a miniture bottle with the Tomatin Cask Strength. It was pretty good. I may have to get a large bottle and do more testing. Reminded me of the Samaroli Evolution 2013. We'll open our bottle of that someday and verify it.

Bought, but unopened.

Saw these near the checkout counter at Total Wines. Should be fun to try them some day.

I got into a bit of trouble with this elixer mixed with some lime juice (i.e. a Snake Bite) at one New Year's party a long long time ago...so I'm told. That doesn't stop it from still being yummy, and me having a snort of it every once-in-a-while.

Best stuff for use in a blizzard. I don't mean a drink called "Blizzard", I mean while sitting by a roaring fire during a real blizzard.


THE NOT SO GOOD STUFF
...OR...
STUFF THAT HAS BEEN REPLACED BY A BETTER VERSION
...OR...
STUFF THAT IS OK, BUT THAT I WON'T BUY AGAIN
...OR...
INTERESTING STUFF THAT OTHER FOLKS HAVE LET ME TRY

Of course this is all subjective, but some of these are things I'd never buy, or buy again. And yes, I have tasted them. It's not like they are okra or anything that you know is bad just by looking at it, and without even tasting it.

I'm starting to taste enough things that just as I find one thing that I like someone shows me a better version. The items that have fallen out of flavor are also in here. They aren't bad. I'm just turning into a snob and getting picky.

Very nice scotch. Just add a teaspoon of water and you are good to go. I like the A'Bunadh variety of Aberlour better.

This is what I would call a fairly substantial Islay scotch. Not an entirely overpowering scent and flavor of peat smoke, but close. A slight bit of water makes it quite good. Very nice, not real expensive, and widely available. You're probably not going to find it at a Piggly Wiggly grocery store or anything, but you get the idea.

While this is supposed to be "the best" I think I'm going to have to go with Lagavulin, instead.

Was my favorite until I happened across Jack Daniel's Single Barrel. I still try to keep a bottle on hand for lesser friends and relatives.

Tested this against the 10 year limited edition and it comes across sweeter and smoother than the 10, which, being wimpy, I kinda like better. I guess I'll still just have to drink them both.

This isn't bad. I've been slurping down the regular version of Bulleit Bourbon for some time. This doesn't seem quite as smooth, but I'll do my best to choke it down. I now have this and a bottle of the regular Bulleit. Let the testing begin.

Later: In a head-to-head with the regular Bulleit Bourbon this one was not as smooth. It's dryer (in a wine-like way) and not as friendly. But all of that is not a bad thing. The flavor is very close to that of the regular version, and that continues for the 30 minutes or so while I tasted both versions after adding a touch of water, but this one was just always a bit edgier.

Oh, I hate to piss off a whole country of Irishmen like this, but I just didn't care for it. However, in my defense, you can see that I've managed to get the contents down to half a bottle. I won't say exactly what I used it for, but it was for a noble purpose -- in a janitorial sense anyway. Like the Jim Beam below there's just some aftertaste to it that I don't like. I'm not even sure what it is. I think I was even on a waiting list for a while to get this. "Matured In Three Woods", it says on the label. Next time I would consider using casks, instead of three different forests. Geeze. Now I've really pissed them off.

Later: You know what? Maybe this isn't so bad. In the end it started to come around and not taste funny...to me.

Any limoncello is better that nothing after a nice Italian dinner, but this one isn't my favorite. It has some slightly soapy aftertaste to it. It seems to be some kind of combination of the lemon and the alcohol. It's also clear and rather thin. The ones I had in Italy were not clear and were thicker. I was fooled into buying it by the frosted glass bottle.

Bought this on a whim. There's not a whole lot of taste to it, but it's just a nice airy whiskey that happens to be named after a town in the state where I live. It's a little pricy for what you get, but so is Taos, New Mexico.

Found it at Walmart for $20. Hey! You never know. The plastic bottle is a nice touch. It brings peace of mind to the experience. You don't have to worry about getting drunk and dropping it.

Later: Tried it. Well.............................. If you add a bit of water I'm pretty sure it won't make it poisonious, or any more poisonious. The alcohol fumes are slightly antiseptic, instead of ethanolic. If it's made for splashing on ice it suceedes. An ice berg may work better than cubes.

Hmmm. It's not BAD, but there's just not much to it. It's a little too light and airy. Maybe that's the point. Not a bit of peat if you don't like peat. Sort of a licorice flavor after some water and time.

Later: This might be kinda growing on me the more I pay attention to it.

Later later: I may have to get another bottle of this.

Tried this at a tasting. Nice and simple. A little water helps to bring out more aroma and taste. Probably would serve something better to William Wallace if he dropped by, but I'd have no problem bringing this to a nice picnic.

YUMMY! I kept seeing all of these cinnamon liquors around the stores and finally got to try this one at a relative's house. Nice fad. Though, at 33% it really shouldn't be called a whisky (that's 40% minimum).

Not the best. Thought that it would be since it's single barrel, but it couldn't hold a candle to the Jack Daniel's Single Barrel that was tasted next.

Sampled this against the single barrel version of Evan Willimans. It's not bad, but the single barrel was more to my liking, and that's what it's all about.

In one of the interesting twists of beverage tasting you can see this bottle is empty. I had a little help from my relatives, because I couldn't stand it. Some of them loved it. I much prefer Jack Daniel's Single Barrel. This just tasted like paint thinner to me. With a little water it tasted like wet paint thinner.

No. The bottle was NOT full when we started the evening.

This was the last scotch of nine at a tasting I went to at a Total Wines store. Either I was drunk by the end, or I was relieved to be getting the taste of Smokey Joe's out of my mouth (it was offered at the same tasting), or it really wasn't too bad. After buying a bottle, and doing some further testing it turned out it was last one. Very nice.

In head-to-head tasting I think I like the Grangestone 30 better.

Was just a bit too fruity for my taste. Prunes, specfically, came to mind. Wasn't as bad as the Monarch Glen, though, which was at the same tasting.

Nice. Not a lot of aroma, but a bit of a peat flavor and quite smooth with a dash of water. I wonder how the 25 year old version is? At about $500 a bottle I'll settle for the 12 year old and just imagine it being twice as good for quite some time.

$500 wouldn't be a bad thing, if it's good, but think of all the other things you could try for that much money.

As far as Highland Whiskys go, though, I can't say this would be my favorite. It's not bad. It's just not a taste I prefer.

Not a lot of flavor to my pallet. Is there really such a thing as a 'boutique whiskey?' Kinda tasted like it was made with Hudson River water.

I'd be OK with using this to clean someone else's carburetor parts, but not mine. I'd also be OK with never buying it again. There's just some aftertaste to it that I don't like. It's a shame. It's got its 'born on date' and everything.

Later: You know...after the 3rd or 4th chance this might not be so bad, but I don't think I'll buy anymore of it.

Very nice. Now I see why it's so popular. We tasted this and the Red Label at a tasting. I liked this better.

Later: I tried this against the Gold Label. The Gold won, but this is certainly fine if there is no Gold available.

Oh dear. This stuff is kinda good. I wonder if the regular, or reserve versions of JWG are as good? The Gold might just take the place of the Black if they are. I don't think they make this version anymore, but probably will in another hundred years.

Later: We didn't have any of this to compare with the regular Gold Label, but I think they were very close, if not the same. The Gold Label Reserve is very good.

It's OK, but I still prefer the Johnnie Walker Black Label.

Later: Yup. Had more of this and it just doesn't seem to have as much going on as the Black Label. This tastes more expensive, but doesn't taste as much.

It's OK, but I didn't think this was as good as the Johnnie Walker Black Label.

Didn't like this at all in the beginning. Now the bottle is down almost half way. Still not a big fan. I just don't think I'm liking these wineafied whiskies. If I were to pour a shot of scotch into a glass of wine it wouldn't taste good, so why should these? I'll keep at it.

After about 2/3rds of the bottle gone I don't think I'll be buying it again.

Nice. Peaty and smooth, but I think the Lagavulin 16 is more my favorite.

Interesting. The smell of this is like hazelnut bubblegum, but the taste is just vodka.

An old standby. I've broken many a red wax seal and -- all of a sudden -- had people coming out of the woodwork with empty glasses. Some of them I didn't even know. A little water (like a teaspoon) changes this just like it does scotches, and smoothes it right out. I think I like the Jack Daniel's Single Barrel better, though.

A little added water changes any whisk(e)y, but be careful. If you add too much your glass of gold just comes out tasting like a wet dishrag, especially young ones bottled at 40%. Experiment!

Those neighbors come up with the darndest things. This was imported from Portland, Oregon, and it's pretty good. It may be a little too sweet to drink by itself, but it certainly could be a good alternative to Coffee Mate.

Too pruney. And adding water didn't help. It only made MORE of it that had to be drunk.

I like the Taketsuru. I'm not sure I like this. It just didn't wow me the first time I tried it. I'll have to do more testing.

Later: Did the testing. It's good, but I just like the Takesuru better.

No. Wait...no. It's a no-no. What is tequila supposed to taste like, anyway?? I just can't get into them. Maybe the shots just don't stay in your mouth long enough.

When you think Islay Scotch think peat smoke, oak casks, fruit flavors, and fresh clean water. When you think of this think of pine campfile ashes mixed with used dishwater. I found it to be dreadful. At least it's not chill-filtered. Tasted it at a Total Wines scotch tasting class. There were several tables of people there that voted this their favorite at the end of the evening. They weren't wearing straight jackets or anything. It must just be me, or they were there because they didn't know anything.

Not the dreck that is Smokey Joe, but I'd just never buy it. Life's too short to buy something that tries to be smokey, instead of just ending up smokey as part of the normal processing. I'd call that a fake, and pandering just to sell stuff.

Well...it's not bad, but there's nothing really special about it. Cardhu-like but not as good.

Strathisla whiskys have made up the larger percentage of Chivis Regal blends for 50 years. My brother found this bottle on one of his trips to foreign lands and we opened it up and tried a little. It's a little tricky to find over here. It was quite good. A little water brought out a tour de force of flavor that, while strong, was not overpowering. Very nice. Either I was a little wobbly when I took this picture, or my iPad was.

Later: Tried this same bottle a few months later. It was about 1/2 empty. It was still pretty tasty.

Nope. What is this stuff supposed to taste like? Three of us couldn't figure it out, and I've tried it again since, but it's just not what I was thinking it should be. It just never seemed to have a lot of real interesting flavors. There was a hint of something, probably rum, but just not enough of anything else to make it really good. Surprising. The Balvenie DoubleWood is great. Maybe I'll just add a little Bacardi 151 to it. Oh well.

Tried a bit of this from a new bottle. The first pour had a bit of an isopropyl alcohol...ummm...tsunami for the first few minutes, but then settled down. Tastes very young. Needs water. I'll try to get the guy that bought this on to something more sensible like The Balvenie. Trader Joe, stick to selling other stuff.

Came across this at a bar in Flagstaff, Arizona called Altitudes. Never even heard of this scotch, but it turns out it has quite a history. Look for Haig. It's a very smooth and easy going blend, and you can buy it at the Cork And Barrel store in Flagstaff.

Had a chance to try this against the regular Cardhu. The Cardhu was tasty right out of the gate, but the Dimple took a while and some water. Once it did come out of it's shell it was OK, but I think the Cardhu would be a better choice.


THE SPEED OF SCOTCH

I don't drink often, but when I do I enjoy a nice Balvenie DoubleWood and an Arturo Fuente Rosado Gran Reserva by the fire pit.


FOR INFO GALORE

(Picture stolen from ralfy.com.)

For information about the world of fine whisk(e)ys and other good things to drink in an easy to digest form that won't impair your ability to operate heavy machinery go to ralfy.com and check out the videos of the maltytalented Ralfy Mitchell. His videos will even give you handy tips on how to behave in the world of fine drinking so you won't look like a complete noob -- or an American -- and lots of info to make the whole experience more enjoyable. He's from Scotland, and a member of the Glasgow Whisky Club where they know what they are doing when it comes to this stuff. There are over 650 Whisky Reviews on his site and I have (took about 9 months to catch up to the beginning of 2015) seen them all. They are all entertaining, informative, and straight from the heart.


2017-08-23