THIS WASN'T A BAMBI MOVIE

...but we did have a thumper. Thumper, in our case, wasn't a rabbit, but a Gisco Electronic Seismic Source that was used for creating the shock waves that were recorded as they bounced around. The unit did its job by lifting the metal ram, that you can see resting on the ground in the picture below, with an electric motor and then releasing it and allowing it to slam into a piece of steel that was laying on the ground. Al Leverette, from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), ran the thumper for the whole experiment.

The ram didn't just fall down, but was pulled down by the largest rubber band I've ever seen.

The thumper had a motor for thumping, but not for moving around. When moving one make sure you don't run. There was a warning sign on the cart stating that the maximum allowed speed was 5 miles per hour. We all thought that was kind of funny. Below Robert Martinez, of DTRA, Al, and Rob Abbot, of Sandia's Solid Dynamics and Energetic Experiments Department, who was one of the people that put this project together, then left to do more interesting things after the first day and a half, are moving the thumper to one of the 16 or so shot points that were laid out around the site.



DIRECT LINKS TO PAGES:
A QUICKIE IN KIRTLAND
THAT'S A FACT
SENSORS FROM HELL
THIS WASN'T A BAMBI MOVIE...
THUMP AND STACK
CAN'T WIN 'EM ALL
THE QUICK AND THE DONE

2018-02-08