THE BEGINNING

First off, do not attempt to adjust your computer's monitor. Many of these pictures are just plain bad. All of them are scans of printed pictures. Most of the construction was done under a blue plastic tarp to keep out the sun and the rain. I tried to correct the colors as best I could to keep everyone from getting seasick. Several of the pictures were also taken with a camera that had several bad lens days.

Since I had little or no idea what I was doing I figured my first project should be a storage box for all of my building stuff.

Out of one full sheet of plywood I fashioned a box. I cut the sides, used a hand chisel to form the joints between all of the sides, and then epoxied and nailed up the six sides into a cube. Once the epoxy was dry I took a saw and cut off the top section, added hinges and a hasp, and couldn't stall any longer. That box actually turned out to be a nice piece of furniture.

The first trick was finding a spot flat enough to build on that was not too far from the water, but that was also not too close to where the action was. I used the back yard of some friends in the back of the bay in the barrio of Palinpinon. The area was just big enough for the finished product, and was about five meters from the water.

The first portion of the boat I put together was the bottom. I used 3/4" (18mm) marine grade plywood and the heaviest pieces of molavy that I had (a kind of mahogany) to keep the bottom of the boat heavy to give it some stability.

Once the bottom was finished I put the sides together and attached them to the bottom. Once the sides were in I was able to fit and attach the flat bow to the front of the boat. The sides were 1/2" (12mm) marine grade plywood.

The bow of Sweetie was 3/4" plywood, and most of the stern (the back) was two layers of 3/4" plywood epoxied and nailed together to support the weight and the torque of the engine.

I needed an engine. The plan was always for a small outboard. Using it would keep the boat maneuverable, give me reverse capability, and make it possible to get in close to everything since the motor could be ran tilted up slightly. Fortunately one of the yachts in the bay sold me a 15HP Suzuki. He had bought the engine used several years before, and I used it for over a year, and neither one of us had any problems with it. It was very reliable.

Just checking to see if I would fit. I did.



DIRECT LINKS TO PAGES:
HOW BUILD A BIG BOAT
THE CONCEPT
THE BEGINNING
WORKING WORKING
ALMOST READY
JUST A COUPLE MORE THINGS
FLOAT TEST
A GOOD DAY
THE NOT SO POINTY END
THE OUTSIDE
THE INSIDE AND THE TOPSIDE
FINISHING TOUCHES
LAUNCH DAY
I THOUGHT I WAS FINISHED?
WHAT IT WAS BUILT FOR

2018-02-08