THE NOT SO POINTY END

After the test drive it was apparent that the flat bow, while not being a particularly bad idea, wasn't a particularly good idea either. The bow made every little wave that the boat ran into feel like the boat was running over a chicken. It probably would have been OK, but I decided to change it anyway. I was on a roll.

It started out as few sticks and pieces of bamboo. I wanted to get a bow that looked good, split the waves in a reasonable manner, but that wouldn't involve any severely fancy compound curves which would be nearly impossible to work with by myself.

After about a dozen different layouts I settled on one of them and built the frame. The bottom was tilted up slightly to allow the boat to still run up on the beach, but not too much. I estimated that the final draught of the boat was only going to be about 4"/10cm, so if the bow tilted up too far it would weigh down the bow of the boat, instead of adding buoyancy to it which would just compensate for the slightly heavy bow. Sounds like I knew what I was doing, huh?

The frame members were all fashioned out of hand carved 2"x2" pieces of hardwood. It took a while since the six sections of panels that were to be added all ran along at different angles. I added a section of 2x2 that ran from the tip of the bow straight back to the flat surface of the old bow. You can see it in the picture below. I put that in to keep the new bow from collapsing if I were to ram into something. It seemed like a good idea, but I never did run into anything to test it.

Not that I thought it would ever fill up with water or anything (it's amazing how well crossing your fingers works), I gave the whole interior a good coating of red lead paint to prevent water from soaking into the wood and causing dry rot.

With a bit of grunting, a bunch of epoxy, and a boatload full of copper nails, the 1/2" plywood panels were installed. I didn't have any compound curves (where the plywood had to be bent in two different directions at the same time), but I did have to twist four of the panels into place.



DIRECT LINKS TO PAGES:
HOW BUILD A BIG BOAT
THE CONCEPT
THE BEGINNING
WORKING WORKING
ALMOST READY
JUST A COUPLE MORE THINGS
FLOAT TEST
A GOOD DAY
THE NOT SO POINTY END
THE OUTSIDE
THE INSIDE AND THE TOPSIDE
FINISHING TOUCHES
LAUNCH DAY
I THOUGHT I WAS FINISHED?
WHAT IT WAS BUILT FOR

2018-02-08