THE INSIDE AND THE TOPSIDE

Now that Sweetie was upright I went to work finishing up the interior. Everything in the pictures below was made of wood, and every curve, hole, joint, and goofy shape was carved with hand tools. I must have been nuts. It must have been the heat.

The curved pieces with the holes in the picture above were put in place to tie the bottom and the sides of the boat together. They made the sides of the boat very rigid. The hole, in addition to being decorative, also gave me a place to tie cargo down to.

Up to this point I still wasn't quite sure what I was going to use for the flooring.

I settled on 1"x6" coconut lumber planks. Since the benches on either side of the boat were removable for cleaning, and for large cargo hauling, it made sense to make the flooring removable so water and sand could be cleaned out. You can see one of the floor panels standing up inside the boat a couple of pictures down the page.

The top. For some reason I never worried much about how I was going to build the boat, but I had nightmares about how I was going to build the top. I fretted over the construction of the top from the first nail.

I had no concept of how I was going to build the top until it came time to do it. Then after about an hour of just sitting and starring at Sweetie it finally came to me. The actual cover was made of a plastic tarp material that was pretty popular around the Philippines. It was kind of a rubberized nylon. I took the measurements in to one of the fabric shops in Dumaguete (the big city about 50 kilometers away), and they sent them off to Manila to have the top constructed. The frame for the top was made of eight 2"x2" hardwood pillars that went up and bolted to four 1"x2" rafters. The two rafters met in the middle and were tied together with two gusset plates. The gusset plates had a notch cut in them so that a piece of bamboo the right diameter, and the whole length of the boat, could lay in the notch as a ridge pole.

The whole thing was prevented from swaying fore and aft by a piece of bamboo that was mounted vertically in the front of the boat. The frame was attached to the top of the sides of the boat by eight bolts at the bottom of the pillars. While it didn't look like much, the roof could support the weight of at least a couple of people hanging from the ridge pole. And even though there were only a few pieces of rope to fasten the tarp to the frame the tarp never budged, even during winds caused by passing typhoons.



DIRECT LINKS TO PAGES:
HOW BUILD A BIG BOAT
THE CONCEPT
THE BEGINNING
WORKING WORKING
ALMOST READY
JUST A COUPLE MORE THINGS
FLOAT TEST
A GOOD DAY
THE NOT SO POINTY END
THE OUTSIDE
THE INSIDE AND THE TOPSIDE
FINISHING TOUCHES
LAUNCH DAY
I THOUGHT I WAS FINISHED?
WHAT IT WAS BUILT FOR

2018-02-08